I Won’t Back Down

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY!! I grew up listening to a LOT of Tom Petty. This was mostly because my Dad was (and still is) in a Tom Petty Tribute Band. Whenever I hear a Tom Petty song, I can’t not hear my Dad. Much like my Dad, I love Tom Petty’s music. Today I decided on tuning back to “I Won’t Back Down” (Tom Petty’s first single released from his first solo album, Full Moon Fever).

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: April 1989

TRIVIA: In January 2015, it was revealed that an agreement had been reached whereby Petty and Jeff Lynne would be credited as co-writers of Sam Smith’s song “Stay with Me” and receive 12.5% of its royalties. Petty’s publishing company had contacted Smith’s publisher after noticing a likeness between “Stay with Me” and “I Won’t Back Down”. Petty clarified that he did not believe Smith plagiarized him, saying “All my years of songwriting have shown me these things can happen. Most times you catch it before it gets out the studio door but in this case it got by. Sam’s people were very understanding of our predicament and we easily came to an agreement”. Smith claimed he had never heard “I Won’t Back Down” before he wrote “Stay with Me”, but he acknowledged the similarity after listening to the song, and said that the likeness was “a complete coincidence”. Petty and Lynne were not eligible for a Grammy Award (“Stay with Me” was nominated for three awards at the 57th annual ceremony, winning two of them) as the Recording Academy considered “Stay with Me” to have been interpolated from “I Won’t Back Down” by Smith, James Napier, and William Phillips, the writers of “Stay with Me”; Petty and Lynne were instead given certificates to honor their participation in the work, as is usual for writers of sampled or interpolated work.

BONUS VIDEOS:
“STAY WITH ME” by Sam Smith

“STAY WITH ME/WON’T BACK DOWN” (showing the incredible similarities)

See you next Tuesday!!

Advertisements

I’m Still Standing

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY!! Today I’m tuning it back to “I’m Still Standing” by Elton John. The song is fantastic and the music video is wonderfully cheesy! It will definitely bring a smile to your face.

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: July 3, 1983

TRIVIA: The video, directed by Russell Mulcahy, was shot in Cannes (InterContinental Carlton Cannes) and Nice on the Côte d’Azur in France and features the colours of the French flag.

Bruno Tonioli, later a judge on the hit shows Strictly Come Dancing for BBC (UK) and its American adaptation, Dancing with the Stars for ABC in the US, appears as one of the dancers in the video.

It was due to be shot over the course of two days, but a camera full of the first day’s film was ruined when Mulcahy accidentally fell into the sea with it. Therefore, it had to be filmed again on another day.

During the shoot for the video, Elton John came across Duran Duran. He complained he was exhausted at having been up since 4 o’clock in the morning. Simon Le Bon decided John should have a martini. “So I did,” John later recalled, “I had six.”

See you next Tuesday!!

Escapade

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY! In honour of Janet Jackson’s concert here in Toronto tonight, I’m tuning it back to one of her classics, “Escapade”.

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: January 8, 1990

TRIVIA: Jackson and Jam & Lewis came up with the song’s theme after hearing the word used in a conversation, deciding it would make an interesting song title due to the word being uncommon. “We usually come up with the music first, then we try to think of a title that fits the way the music sounds”, Jam said. “And ‘Escapade’ we thought was a cool word. It is kind of old fashioned — people don’t really say ‘Let’s go on an escapade’ anymore, but it really worked with that track.”

See you next Tuesday!

Who’s That Girl?

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY! Today I’m tuning it back to the summer of 1987 with a couple songs from a movie I watched frequently as a child, “WHO’S THAT GIRL?” starring Madonna.

“CAUSING A COMMOTION”

ORIGINAL SINGLE RELEASE DATE: August 25, 1987

TRIVIA: The song was inspired by her then husband Sean Penn and their often tumultuous relationship. Madonna felt that her marriage to Penn was on the verge of breaking-up, due to Penn’s abusive and violent nature. That translated as the inspiration behind the song. In a Rolling Stone article dated September 10, 1987, Madonna spoke about Penn’s impact on her life and the song,

“I don’t like violence. I never condone hitting anyone, and I never thought that any violence should have taken place. But on the other hand, I understood Sean’s anger and believe me, I have wanted to hit him many times. I never would, you know, because I realize that it would just make things worse. […] I felt like he was ‘Causing a Commotion’ to purposefully distract me. I wrote this song and vented my frustration in it.”

“WHO’S THAT GIRL?”

ORIGINAL SINGLE RELEASE DATE: June 30, 1987

TRIVIA: In 1986, Madonna was shooting for her third motion picture Who’s That Girl, known at the time as Slammer. Needing songs for the soundtrack of the movie, she contacted Patrick Leonard and Stephen Bray, who had written and produced her third studio album True Blue in 1986. Madonna explained to them that she needed an uptempo song and a downtempo song. She came to the studio one Thursday as Leonard developed the chorus of the song. He handed over that cassette to Madonna, who went to the backroom and finished the melody and the lyrics of the song, while Leonard worked on the other parts of the song.

After finishing the lyrics, Madonna declared that she wanted the song to be named “Who’s That Girl” and changed the movie to the same, rather than Slammer, considering it to be a better title. In Fred Bronson’s The Billboard Book of Number 1 Hits book, Leonard explained that the song was recorded in one day with Madonna adding her vocals only once. Additional instrumental tracks with guitars and percussion were included by Leonard and Bray later. Regarding the development of the music for the film, Madonna further explained

“I had some very specific ideas in mind, music that would stand on its own as well as support and enhance what was happening on screen and the only way to make that a reality was to have a hand in writing the tunes myself. […] The songs aren’t necessarily about Nikki [her character name in the movie] or written to be sung by someone like her, but there’s a spirit to this music that captures both what the film and the characters are about, I think.”

See you next Tuesday!!

Wes Craven

wescraven

With the news of Wes Craven’s passing this week, I’ve decided to dedicate today’s TUNEBACK TUESDAY to him. He was one of my favourite directors and heavily influenced me growing up. I can still remember the day I was first introduced to the “Nightmare on Elm Street” series. I was 8 years old and it was a rainy day with not much to do. My Mother suggested I rent a movie so I walked over to the nearby Drug Store (during the brief time they rented movies) where my Grandmother worked. It was there that I spotted “A Nightmare on Elm Street 3” and “A Nightmare on Elm Street 4”. I watched both movies that afternoon and was instantly hooked. Although Wes Craven didn’t direct either film (he was involved with part 3, however), it was his creation, Freddy Krueger, that had a lasting impression on me and turned me into a Wes Craven fan.

Here is a selection of movie trailers of his films (and a couple music videos) to honour the master of horror.

“A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET” (1984)

Featured Song: PROLOGUE/MAIN TITLE (by Charles Bernstein)


“A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET 3: DREAM WARRIORS” (1987)

Featured Song: DREAM WARRIORS (by Dokken)


“THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW” (1988)


“THE PEOPLE UNDER THE STAIRS” (1991)


“WES CRAVEN’S NEW NIGHTMARE” (1994)


“SCREAM” (1996)

Featured Song: RED RIGHT HAND (by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds)

Thank you for the nightmares, Wes. Rest in peace.