I Think I Love You

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY! In honour of David Cassidy (who passed away last week), I’m tuning it back to “I Think I Love You” by The Partridge Family.

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: August 22, 1970

TRIVIA: The single was produced by Wes Farrell and issued on Bell Records a month before the debut of the network television musical sitcom The Partridge Family. During the show’s first season the song was featured on the show twice as it was climbing the actual Billboard charts.

The only cast members of the television show to actually sing on the recording of the song were David Cassidy and Shirley Jones. Background vocals on this, and all other Partridge Family recordings, were provided by veteran session singers: Ron Hicklin, John Bahler, Tom Bahler, and Jackie Ward.

See you next Tuesday!

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Proud Mary

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY!! This weekend Tina Turner will be celebrating her 78th Birthday! To honour the living legend, I’m tuning it back to “Proud Mary”. Enjoy!

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: January 30, 1971

TRIVIA: Proud Mary was written by John Fogerty and first recorded by his band Creedence Clearwater Revival in January 1969. The line “Left a good job in the city” was written following Fogerty’s discharge from the National Guard, and the line “rollin’ on the river” was from a movie by Will Rogers.

BONUS VIDEO: Here’s CCR doing the original version of the song…

See you next Tuesday!

Nights on Broadway

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY!! I’ve had the Bee Gees stuck in my head for the past few days (due to seeing my Dad’s tribute band, STAYIN’ ALIVE Canada, perform over the weekend in Vegas)… so today I’m tuning it back to “Nights on Broadway”. Enjoy!!

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: September 1975

TRIVIA: Producer Arif Mardin asked if one of the Bee Gees members could do some screaming during the main chorus to make the song more exciting. In response, Barry Gibb began singing higher and higher, eventually singing it in a falsetto that was unexpectedly powerful. He had never known he had such an ability and Barry’s falsetto became a trademark of the Bee Gees, although Maurice had been harmonizing in falsetto for years. Barry recalled in a May 2001 interview with Mojo magazine “Arif said to me, ‘Can you scream?’ I said, ‘under certain circumstances’. He said, ‘Can you scream in tune?’ I said, ‘well, I’ll try’ “.

See you next Tuesday!

Believe

Happy TUNEBACK TUESDAY!! Well… tomorrow I’m seeing Cher, live in concert!!! So in honour of this fantastic woman, I’m tuning it back to “Believe”. Enjoy!

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: October 19, 1998

TRIVIA: Cher’s voice is altered by a pitch correction speed that is “set too fast for the audio that it is processing.” Producer Mark Taylor added the effect to Cher’s vocal simply as a kind of mischievous experiment. In interviews at the time, he claimed to be testing out his recently purchased DigiTech Talker. It later emerged that the effect was not created by a vocoder, but by using extreme (and then-unheard-of) settings on Antares Auto-Tune. Taylor said about the effect that “this was the most nerve-wracking part of the project, because I wasn’t sure what Cher would say when she heard what I’d done to her voice”, but that when she heard it she said, “It sounds great.” When her record company requested that the effect be removed, she responded, “Over my dead body!” After the massive success of the song, use of Auto-Tune became very popular and many other artists imitated this technique, and it would eventually become known as the “Cher effect”.

See you next Tuesday!!